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Florian

Kaleidoscope + Tower: the perfect Git setup

  • Florian 
Kaleidoscope + Tower

Developers make up the largest segment of Kaleidoscope customers. Many of you use the Git version control system to manage your source code, regardless of the programming language you may be using. The Kaleidoscope team also uses Git, and today we want to tell you about an app that most of us use on a daily basis.

There’s an obvious synergy between Tower and Kaleidoscope: Tower is a great front end to Git’s change management and Kaleidoscope is a tool for dealing with changes. Here are a few scenarios, beyond comparing two files, that may not be obvious and can help you optimize your workflow.

Comparing Archive Contents with Kaleidoscope

  • Florian 

Over the last few months, we’ve received several feature requests for the ability to compare the contents of archives like .zip or .jar. Indeed, an archive is really a folder full of files, a folder that happens to be compressed into a single file. So we should be able to compare archives using Kaleidoscope.

Today we are happy to announce that, as of Kaleidoscope 3.5, comparing archives is possible, via a brand new action for Shortcuts.

Kaleidoscope team announces a new company name

We (Christopher and Florian) are delighted to share with you the news that we have formed a new company, Leitmotif GmbH. Kaleidoscope and Versions will become a part of it. This change reflects our strong and continuing commitment to Kaleidoscope and Versions.

Combining the power of Unix and Kaleidoscope – Tips for using ksdiff

This article covers a few lesser known tips and tricks that can dramatically increase productivity when working with Kaleidoscope. Using ksdiff, you can integrate Kaleidoscope into any workflow that produces text or images and benefit from its comparison capabilities.

There are three powerful features we want to highlight in this article, using the –label option to name the target window, piping content into ksdiff, and process substitution. And there is an advanced bonus hint…

Combining the power of Unix and Kaleidoscope – Introduction

Kaleidoscope comes with a hidden gem that drives many integrations with system technologies and software programs: the ksdiff command. We’ll show you how to make the most of Kaleidoscope by harnessing the power of this gem in this two part series.

This first article describes the basic usage of the ksdiff command line tool, and why you should consider using it.

Kaleidoscope Developer Tools for Safari, Part 2

  • Florian 

As announced last week in Part 1 of our article focusing on JavaScript debugging, this second part shows how to take advantage of Kaleidoscope Developer Tools for Safari when working on web page content and layout.

The extension allows you to send HTML or CSS to Kaleidoscope, enabling you to compare the changes you are making, while you iterate on your latest web page or web app.

Less drudgery, more fun: using Kaleidoscope with XCTest failures

  • Florian 

Most developers for Apple platforms deal with tests in some way or another. XCTest is probably the most popular framework because it’s built directly into Xcode and can be integrated with build processes and automation.

However, one problem with those tests is that more complex failures are not easy to interpret. And if things aren’t easy (and fun) to use, developers will have a resistance to using them. Wouldn’t it be nice if Kaleidoscope could show XCTest failures in a useful format?

What’s new in the macOS Monterey command line

  • Florian 

The other day we found a helpful command line tool option, only to discover later that the option was only available in macOS Monterey. Since we also need to target Big Sur, this would not be an option for us. So we created something to help us overcome similar issues in the future: a way to compare man pages between macOS system versions. And that’s what we want to share with you today.