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Florian

Combining the power of Unix and Kaleidoscope – Tips for using ksdiff

  • Florian 
  • 9 min read

This article covers a few lesser known tips and tricks that can dramatically increase productivity when working with Kaleidoscope. Using ksdiff, you can integrate Kaleidoscope into any workflow that produces text or images and benefit from its comparison capabilities.

There are three powerful features we want to highlight in this article, using the –label option to name the target window, piping content into ksdiff, and process substitution. And there is an advanced bonus hint…

Combining the power of Unix and Kaleidoscope – Introduction

  • Florian 
  • 7 min read

Kaleidoscope comes with a hidden gem that drives many integrations with system technologies and software programs: the ksdiff command. We’ll show you how to make the most of Kaleidoscope by harnessing the power of this gem in this two part series.

This first article describes the basic usage of the ksdiff command line tool, and why you should consider using it.

Kaleidoscope Developer Tools for Safari, Part 2

  • Florian 
  • 6 min read

As announced last week in Part 1 of our article focusing on JavaScript debugging, this second part shows how to take advantage of Kaleidoscope Developer Tools for Safari when working on web page content and layout.

The extension allows you to send HTML or CSS to Kaleidoscope, enabling you to compare the changes you are making, while you iterate on your latest web page or web app.

Less drudgery, more fun: using Kaleidoscope with XCTest failures

  • Florian 
  • 5 min read

Most developers for Apple platforms deal with tests in some way or another. XCTest is probably the most popular framework because it’s built directly into Xcode and can be integrated with build processes and automation.

However, one problem with those tests is that more complex failures are not easy to interpret. And if things aren’t easy (and fun) to use, developers will have a resistance to using them. Wouldn’t it be nice if Kaleidoscope could show XCTest failures in a useful format?

What’s new in the macOS Monterey command line

  • Florian 
  • 6 min read

The other day we found a helpful command line tool option, only to discover later that the option was only available in macOS Monterey. Since we also need to target Big Sur, this would not be an option for us. So we created something to help us overcome similar issues in the future: a way to compare man pages between macOS system versions. And that’s what we want to share with you today.

Integrating Alfred and Kaleidoscope

  • Florian 
  • 10 min read

As a long-time Mac user, I’ve seen lots of productivity tools come and go, and I’ve used a fair amount of them through the years. Who still remembers Quicksilver (β)? It was pretty awesome at the time… Other notable mentions for me personally are Butler by my dear pal Peter Maurer and LaunchBar. There are also still new kids on the block, like RayCast.

However, the one I keep coming back to and that is running 24/7 on my Mac is Alfred. I particularly like its combination of easy discoverability of the more mainstream features and the sheer power it hides by default, but offers when you need it.

Read More »Integrating Alfred and Kaleidoscope

Kaleidoscope 2.4.1

  • Florian 
  • 3 min read

In addition to smaller fixes, there are two changes particularly worth noting in our latest release, Kaleidoscope 2.4.1: New tricks in kspo In case you missed how Kaleidoscope and its new Xcode lldb integration can help improve your debugging workflow, read our previous article Xcode Debugger Integration. In some follow-up support cases to the last release, we came to realize that we could do better and make sending images to Kaleidoscope easier. As it turned out, some AppKit/UIKit classes are notoriously hard to convert into the right destination format. Under the hood, the runtime sometimes uses optimized structures. In Kaleidoscope… Read More »Kaleidoscope 2.4.1

Xcode Debugger Integration

  • Florian 
  • 8 min read

It was October 2018 when Christopher had the idea to integrate Kaleidoscope with lldb, the Xcode Debugger. Back then, he tweeted a gist that showed how to get this to work for his needs.

Many moons later, in February 2021, that feature is finally available to every Kaleidoscope user, configurable with the click of a single button.